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                   Email: nanette@freerangegourmet.com

Friday, April 28, 2006

 

A manifesto for a Free Range Gourmet


The Omnivore's DilemmaThis guy makes so much sense. The best thing I can do is quote a few snippets for you to read.
When you think about it, it is odd that something as important to our health and general well-being as food is so often sold strictly on the basis of price. Look at any supermarket ad in the newspaper and all you will find in it are quantities—pounds and dollars; qualities of any kind are nowhere to be found. . . .

To participate in a local food economy requires considerably more effort than shopping at the Whole Foods. You won’t find anything microwavable at the farmer’s market or in your weekly box of organic produce from the CSA, and you won’t find a tomato in December. The local food shopper will need to put some work into sourcing his own food—learning who grows the best lamb in his area, or the best sweet corn. And then he will have to become reacquainted with his kitchen. Much of the appeal of the industrial food chain is its convenience; it offers busy people a way to delegate their cooking (and food preservation) to others. At the other end of the industrial food chain that begins in a cornfield in Iowa sits an industrial eater at a table. (Or, increasingly, in a car.)

. . . a successful local food economy implies not only a new kind of food producer but a new kind of eater —one who regards finding, preparing, and preserving food as one of the pleasures of life rather than a chore. One whose sense of taste has ruined him for a Big Mac, and whose sense of place has ruined him for shopping for groceries at Wal-Mart. This is the consumer who understands—or remembers—that, in Wendell Berry’s memorable phrase, “eating is an agricultural act.”
Yes! Read an excerpt from Michael Pollan's new book, The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals in the June issue of Mother Jones, or here on the web, or click on the image above to get your own copy from Amazon.

Update: another interesting review of this book by Gordon Morash in today's Toronto Globe and Mail is here.

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